Top 10: Massive Video Game Compilations

Atari Vault (Logo)

When I started purchasing video games with my own money, I used to think that compilations were simply the best way to get the most bang for my buck. They represented this endless source of entertainment that was going to keep me glued to the screen for hours on end. Needless to say, that was rarely the case. Nevertheless, I recently became interested with video game compilations, collections and anthologies because I used to loved them and because I was curious to know which ones have the most video games. Before moving on to the list, note that I followed some guidelines to write this list. I only included games that came out in North America, compilations that were released in the form of different volumes weren’t taken into consideration and these are only official releases. Finally, the goal of this article was to share the compilations with the most number of games, regardless of their quality, so these aren’t necessarily the best, but the ones that are more complete. For a complete list of video game compilations, check out this article on Wikipedia.


10. Midway Arcade Origins (31 Games)

Midway Arcade Origins (Fighter)

The successor to Midways Arcade Treasure series, this compilation features some of the best games that were included there, as well as Vindicators Part II which was never featured in previous anthologies. Other than that, this is a decent collection that packs games that came out on several discs before.


9. Classic Text Adventure Masterpieces of Infocom (33 Games)

Infocom Classic Text Adventures (Games)

If there’s a part of the video game industry that I never got into, that’s probably classic text adventures, so maybe this Infocom compilation is not for me. But if you’re into interactive fiction and if you’re willing to track down a CD-ROM of this game, this is definitely your game, which comes with PDF copies of all the manuals, maps and even a hint books. So go ahead and play some Zork!


8. Namco Museum Virtual Arcade (34 Games)

Namco Museum Virtual Arcade (Ms. Pac-Man)

Released for the Xbox 360 in late 2008, Namco Museum Virtual Arcade is a trip down memory lane that features recent XBLA games, as well as some classics. Some of the included titles are Dig Dug, Galaga, Pac-Man: Championship Edition, Galaxian and Mappy, to name a few. If you want a combination of old and new, you’ll be hard pressed to find a better collection on the Xbox 360.


7. Intellivision Rocks (37 Games)

Intellivision Rocks Asteroids

Released as a PC-only sequel to Intellivision Lives, Rocks is a collection of emulated titles that originally came out for the Intellivision home console. Most of the games included were developed by third-party companies, such as Activision and Imagic, so if you want to experience a part of video game history, go ahead and check out this collection.


6. Taito Legends 2 (43 Games)

Taito Legends 2 Logo

To be clear, Taito Legends features 43 games split across different platforms (the game came out on PS2, PC and Xbox) and if you only got one version, you’d get 39 games. Unfortunately, this happened due to porting issues, forcing collectors to purchase all three versions of the same game. The number of Taito games might seem impressive at first, (this includes everything from The Legend of Kage to Puzzle Bobble 2), but there are several filler and obscure titles not a lot of fans are interested in playing and on top of that, the controls are clunky.


5. Sonic Ultimate Genesis Collection (49 Games)

Sonic Ultimate Genesis Collection (Sonic)

Probably one of the most palatable and easy to digest compilation from this list (not to mention, the one that comes with the newest games) Sonic Ultimate Genesis Collection is a celebration of everything Sega Genesis. Some of the games that are part of the Ultimate Genesis Collection include games from the Altered Beast, Golden Axe, Sonic the Hedgehog, Phantasy Star, Shining Force and Streets of Rage franchises.


4. Intellivision Lives! (64 Games)

Intellivision Lives! Basketball

If you, like me, know next to nothing about the Intellivision console (which was released by Mattel in 1979,) maybe you should play Intellivision Lives. This compilation came out on the Nintendo GameCube, PlayStation 2, Xbox, PC and Nintendo DS, so if you’ve been playing games for a while, you can’t miss it. The control emulation leaves a lot to be desired according to some of the reviews I’ve read, but this is still the best way to play Intellivision games without spending a lot of money on the real thing.


3. Activision Anthology: Remix Edition (76 Games)

Activision Anthology: Remix Edition Binder

If you’re into the Atari 2600, but you don’t want to spend money on the console and track down dozens of cartridges, Activision Anthology is your best option. This collection features most of the Atari 2600 games from Activision, as well as a few homebrews. One of the best parts about this collection is its presentation, since the main menu is basically a kid’s virtual bedroom that you can navigate and choose the games and change other settings. Note that the PC and Mac versions are the ones that have the most number of games, though the game also came out on the PS2, Game Boy Advance, PSP, iOS and Android.


2. Atari Anthology (80 Games)

Atari Anthology

Released for the original PC, Xbox, PlayStation 2 and PSP platforms, this is one of the most complete Atari compilations ever released (though that’s about to change soon.) Apart from an insane number of games, this collection also has artwork, scans of manuals, video interviews, Windows wallpapers and more. In case, you were wondering, classics such as Asteroids, Breakout, Centipede, Combat and Yar’s Revenge are part of this anthology.


1. Atari Vault (100 Games)

Atari Vault Logo

As of this article, Atari Vault isn’t out yet. Nevertheless, this upcoming video game compilation will feature one hundred Atari games that the company has produced for both consoles and arcade cabinets from the 1980s. Of course, you can expect classics like Asteroids, Centipede, Tempest and Missile Command, among many others and where possible and some of those titles will have local and online multiplayer support.


Other massive video game compilations include Rare Replay (30 games,) Taito Legends (29 games,) Sega Genesis Collection (28 games,) Midway Arcade Treasures (24 games) and Namco Museum Remix (24 games.)

  • Yay! Retro shovelware! I have most of these, because I am not very smart. I suppose it justifies my use of pirated ROMs, which are more convenient than these collections anyway.

    • Using emulators is usually the most convenient way of checking out classic titles. Of course, there’s always that gray legal area a lot of people are not that comfortable with. Nevertheless, nothing beats a good compilation.