Assassin’s Creed Movie Review



Despite the talented people behind it, this is a bland adaptation with one-dimensional characters, a simplistic storyline ripped from the games and an incredibly slow pace.


Anyone remotely familiar with video game movies knows that they are terrible. What’s striking about Assassin’s Creed is that this adaptation seemed different because there was talent behind it: it had a promising director, Michael Fassbender (300, X-Men: First Class, Shame and Steve Jobs) plays the role of the protagonist and it felt like everyone involved was treating the film with seriousness. But a few minutes after watching this shoddy adaptation, you’ll understand that even though it’s better made than most films based on games, this is simply more of the same.

First, let’s talk about the story. Callum Lynch is sentenced to death for suspected murder, but he’s offered a second chance by doctor Sofia Rickin, a member of a private organization known as the Abstergo Foundation in Madrid. Abstergo has a piece of technology called the Animus which scans a person’s DNA and uses their genetic memory to transport that individual to ancient times. In the case of Cal, that means turning him into an agile assassin who practices parkour and murders political figures and high-ranking generals in 1942 during the Granada War. The president of Abstergo and his daughter intend to use this machine to send Cal on a quest to retrieve the Apple of Eden, a mystical artifact that contains a map to understand what makes humans violent and therefore, a way to eradicate that.

There are some convincing performances (Michael Fassbender proves, once again, that he can fill the shoes of a main protagonist) and the direction is competent, but this is a film enamored with its source material and barely attempts anything that distances itself from the games it’s based on. This is a movie that it’s at its best when it takes us 500 years into the past and puts the protagonist in scenarios where he can climb buildings and run on walls, fight guards or rescue innocent people. But when this movie tries to make sense or explain why everything is happening, the plot becomes too convoluted for its own good.

Despite the talented people behind it, this is a bland adaptation with one-dimensional characters, a simplistic storyline ripped from the games and an incredibly slow pace. This is not the worst video game adaptation, since there are some redeeming qualities here and there that fans and non fans can enjoy, such as the impressive vistas, competent cinematography or the great looking fight choreography. Still, this leap of faith is not worth taking.